Make Your Art Stand Out With Mockups

As an artist that primarily sells her art online, I love working with mockups to set the scene for my art. I believe it helps potential art buyers to visualize my art in their homes. It also helps give them a sense of size and/or proportion.

Here is an example of my art by itself and my art in a mockup scene:

 

Fluid by Jules Tillman Unframed and in a Mockup Scene
Fluid by Jules Tillman Unframed and in a Mockup Scene

 

As you can see, in the first photo, you can’t really tell how big the painting actually is. In the second, you can see it’s size and how it will look in a room. Because even if the description of the art says it’s 30″x30″, many people are still going to have a hard time visualizing what that means.

Not only do mockups help you sell more art in your online shop, but they are also great for your blog posts and email newsletters. I also like to use them to create “tall” images, optimized for Pinterest, like this one:

 

Abigail by Jules Tillman
Abigail by Jules Tillman – Tall images like this art mockup are perfect for Pinterest!

 

Mockups are really easy to use, too. My friend and fellow artist Adri Luna has a class on Skillshare called Magical Mockups where she shows you just how to use them. (And if you use this link you will get 3 months of Skillshare for just .99 cents!)

But I have learned a few tricks to help make your art stand out with mockups, so I thought I’d share them with you.

There are two main types of mockups: JPG and PSD. I prefer the .PSD mockups because they are so easy to use. BUT, when you have tons of them, like I do, it’s hard to know which one is which. Even if I renamed the file from something like mockup1.psd to modernlivingroommockupwithhorizontalart.psd I still couldn’t know exactly what it looked like because when I went to open it, my folder looked like this:

 

Mockups Folder Before: How the heck am I supposed to know what is what?!
Mockups Folder Before: How the heck am I supposed to know what is what?!

 

And then an idea came to me — and it’s super simple, so pardon me if you’ve already thought of it — but I decided to save a copy of every mockup in that folder as a .JPG so I could actually see which mockup was which. Like this:

 

My mockups folder "After"... isn't that so much easier?!
My mockups folder “After”… isn’t that so much easier?!

 

Just this one very basic idea has helped me so much when working with mockups. I went from opening 10 (or more!) mockups, frustratingly trying to see which one I might use, to simply scanning the .JPG images to see which one will be the best fit and then opening the corresponding .PSD file.

So where can you find mockups?

There are lots of places to find mockups, even free ones like Mockupworls.co and Behance.  But I find a lot of people use the free mockups, and your art will just get mixed in with that crowd. So I prefer to pay for them, even just a little, to help my art, shop, and blog to stand out from the crowd. You can find some at pretty low priced mockups on Etsy. But my personal favorite go to site is Creative Market.

Take a look at some of these cool art mockups from Creative Market:

 

Frame Mockup in White
Frame Mockup in White
Indoor Picture Mockup
Indoor Picture Mockup
Nursery Art Mockup
Nursery Art Mockup
Simple, minimal art mockup bundle.
Simple, minimal art mockup bundle.

 

As you can see, there is a huge variety in style and type! This is just a tiny selection from Creative Market, where you can find hundreds, if not thousands more.

Some key tips and takeaways to remember when working with mockups:

  • PSD files make it easier to insert your art, but you must have Photoshop to use them.
  • Try to find mockups that aren’t widely used, so you art can stand out from the crowd.
  • Add your art to a variety of “scenes” or mockup rooms for every listing in your shop, so that potential buyers can visualize your art in their home.
  • Be sure to represent the size of your artwork accurately! It’s so frustrating when buyers receive their art thinking it would cover their entire wall and it’s only an 8″x10″.
  • If you sell prints in a variety of sizes, use a mockup like this one to showcase that:
Frame mockups for different sized print examples.
Frame mockups for different sized print examples.

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